Testing Blue Wavelength in Philips Hue



  • Hi - long time F.lux user here.

    I recently bought two Philips Hue "White Ambiance" smart bulbs - not the regular Hue, these have no option for RGB. Well, I felt they were maybe disrupting my sleep. I reflected the light with a DVD and it did have some blue in it.

    I'm wondering if anybody has data or insights about blue wavelength production with this model. Perhaps I was simply looking at them too brightly. I searched this forum and couldn't find a clear answer.

    Thank you!


  • f.lux team

    It's on my list to put up some data about these and other smart bulbs. Philips tends to be pretty good, but dimming definitely helps.



  • @mpiazza said in Testing Blue Wavelength in Philips Hue:

    Hi - long time F.lux user here.

    I recently bought two Philips Hue "White Ambiance" smart bulbs - not the regular Hue, these have no option for RGB. Well, I felt they were maybe disrupting my sleep. I reflected the light with a DVD and it did have some blue in it.

    I'm wondering if anybody has data or insights about blue wavelength production with this model. Perhaps I was simply looking at them too brightly. I searched this forum and couldn't find a clear answer.

    Thank you!

    Hi
    As I am about to buy a philips hue system I am interested in what you mean with "these have no rgb". Is it the ambiance version that has no such option or the regular one? And what are your experiences with your product?


  • f.lux team

    Well the thing to understand is that any "warm" light still has a significant amount of blue in it, unless it's red. So color-tuning gets you maybe a factor of three from the coolest to warmest setting, but your body needs at least 100:1 from day to night.

    The trick is to get the number below the level where it really affects your body, and this is a combination of intensity and spectrum.

    So whatever schedule you use, you should schedule lots of dimming too (unless you have one bulb in a 1000sf room).



  • @herf said in Testing Blue Wavelength in Philips Hue:

    Well the thing to understand is that any "warm" light still has a significant amount of blue in it, unless it's red. So color-tuning gets you maybe a factor of three from the coolest to warmest setting, but your body needs at least 100:1 from day to night.

    The trick is to get the number below the level where it really affects your body, and this is a combination of intensity and spectrum.

    So whatever schedule you use, you should schedule lots of dimming too (unless you have one bulb in a 1000sf room).

    So, buying a white ambience version which tends to give 'orange' color is not a good idea. Instead we should have a hue color bulb wich can give red color?


  • f.lux team

    We can look at numbers once I post some, but I do think that dimming is important, and I think orange colors look better. I wouldn't want my house in all-red, though maybe firelight would be ok.

    I would dim your lights and avoid very bright lights at night regardless of the color - there is a chance (from the research) that they are very stimulating even if they don't have a circadian effect.


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