yellowish rather than redish



  • Hi, the night shift setting on an Mac provides a warm tint closer to yellow than red. Both f.lux and the native Win10 Nightlight are much at the red side. Actually I prefer the yellow Mac version, but I am a pc user.

    Soft white (within f.lux) actually comes close to what I want, but the effect is fixed.

    Is there an option that I have overlooked? Thanks!



  • @bikelike said in yellowish rather than redish:

    Hi, the night shift setting on an Mac provides a warm tint closer to yellow than red. Both f.lux and the native Win10 Nightlight are much at the red side. Actually I prefer the yellow Mac version, but I am a pc user.

    Soft white (within f.lux) actually comes close to what I want, but the effect is fixed.

    Is there an option that I have overlooked? Thanks!

    It’s more red because the color temperature is warmer. You can change this manually in both f.lux and Windows Night Light, but keep in mind that the warmer (redder) the color temperature is, the less your melatonin will be suppressed. The less your melatonin is suppressed, the easier it is to go to sleep, and therefore your circadian rhythm is less affected.

    I don’t like the way Apple limits the color temperature of Night Shift. Microsoft does a much better job because they allow the color temperature to get as warm as 1200K while Apple limits it to maybe 2700K (give or take a few hundred Kelvin). This means that Windows Night Light can easily be far more effective than Night Shift.

    The warmer color temperatures do take some getting used to, but it’s worth it because of how important it is to have a good circadian rhythm and high-quality sleep. Of course, the warmer color temperatures will be ineffective if you are still exposed to too much alerting light elsewhere in your home such as your indoor lights, or your T.V., etc.

    If all you’re going for though is just a little bit more comfort, then just set the color temperature manually.



  • Thanks for the answer. Just you don't quite understand what I mean.

    When I choose soft white in f.lux, I get a nice warm tone which is mainly a shift towards yellow. No magenta seems to be added. However, this tone is not available in the color temperature range of f.lux. That is because also magenta is added. Which is similar to the Windows 10 Night Light. Do you understand what I mean now?

    Personally I prefer the yellow shift over the reddish shift. That is why I like Mac better in that respect.

    Ideally there would be a feature within f.lux where both temperature AND tint (as it is called in Lightroom) can be set. Please take that as a warm feature request :-)



  • @bikelike said in yellowish rather than redish:

    Thanks for the answer. Just you don't quite understand what I mean.

    When I choose soft white in f.lux, I get a nice warm tone which is mainly a shift towards yellow. No magenta seems to be added. However, this tone is not available in the color temperature range of f.lux. That is because also magenta is added. Which is similar to the Windows 10 Night Light. Do you understand what I mean now?

    Personally I prefer the yellow shift over the reddish shift. That is why I like Mac better in that respect.

    Ideally there would be a feature within f.lux where both temperature AND tint (as it is called in Lightroom) can be set. Please take that as a warm feature request :-)

    Soft White is approximately 4500-4700K. This is still far too 'alerting' and melatonin-suppressing and circadian-rhythm-disrupting.

    What precisely are you using f.lux for? Comfort? Or for avoiding melatonin suppression? If for comfort, Night Shift is ok. If for avoiding melatonin suppression, Night Shift isn't good. It doesn't matter that it looks better. Looks aren't important when you're trying to avoid melatonin suppression.


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