f.luxometer user manual



  • Hello, where can I find more information abour the f.luxometer? Is there a user manual?
    For example I would like to know if it is wearable, if it is able to take measurements also when not connected to a computer, etc.
    Thanks in advance!


  • f.lux team

    The colormunki spectrometer requires a USB connection to a computer right now. I would not recommend wearable applications with this device.



  • This post is deleted!

  • f.lux team

    Well, you do need a spectrometer to get spectral data.

    We do sell a $200 3-channel meter (not the colormunki) that does work with f.luxometer. With that meter, we estimate melanopic effects using a fit we made to our database of light sources (it is typically <10% error). The 3-channel meter is better for long-term logging of building data (over months) and for lower-light conditions (down to 0.1 lux).



  • @herf said in f.luxometer user manual:

    Well, you do need a spectrometer to get spectral data.

    We do sell a $200 3-channel meter (not the colormunki) that does work with f.luxometer. With that meter, we estimate melanopic effects using a fit we made to our database of light sources (it is typically <10% error). The 3-channel meter is better for long-term logging of building data (over months) and for lower-light conditions (down to 0.1 lux).

    Confusing, this post is above mine, while being after I posted. I guess it was after the main post, anyway it's very helpful for anyone. I think I wanted to say the x-rite device, instead of the colormunki, as it's a bit cheaper and much older device. I would like to know a bit more about the range of a 3 channel meter as I don't know much about them, and I think a spectrometer is more of what I'm looking for, so it may be worth it to just have the one device for less money, rather than having something that may not do what I see on the fluxometer website.

    It's only $500 or so, maybe cheaper in other areas, but if you get a kickback, I'll pay full price, that's definitely worth it, it's a hell of a lot less than $2000! I'm really surprised the x-rite company has produced a device like this, I'm excited. I've wanted to measure indoor fluorescents for a while, and a CD stripe doesn't quite get there, although for no extra cash, it does very well. It's very difficult to tell if a light is low on red and such other details. I like to know how accurate lights are for cooking, so I just stick with old lights in a cooking area.

    Hopefully this type of equipment and ... attention to color quality in a light source will catch on. I really hope it does--going back to cooking, I don't want to guess when meat to cooked to a certain point, whether it be venison (I prefer medium rare, when I know the source, usually family) or chicken etc. I could go on and on about small issues with current light sources, like the usually slight purple tint of daylight CFLs, or the strong purple cast of LED flashlights etc, who knows where this will lead.

    While we're talking about all this, would you recommend the x-rite screen calibrator device, or another one? I'd like to get one, after reading TFT Central, and fluxometer, it's got me quite interested.