Nits in v4.54



  • Thank you for the wording improvements over v4.4x. We're almost there...

    "The sun is up. Light is making your body earlier." <--- "making your body what earlier"? Or possibly, "making your body younger"? or "lighter"? :@)

    Settings ("hamburger") menu > "Adjust day and night colors together...". Actually, that is the proper description for the default behavior. Selecting this option opens up individual sliders for Daytime, Sunset, and Bedtime. So this option should rightfully have a checkbox next to it, if you want to retain the current description. Otherwise it should say "Adjust day and night colors separately..."

    Feature request: Please make the "Effects and extra colors" settings persistent over restarts of f.lux.

    Thanks!



  • P.S. Just sent you a donation for this blessing of a program. Thanks again...



  • I moved my time zone setting east far enough to make f.lux think it was night time already. In that case it says "Getting sleepy? Light is making your body earlier." So we are missing a $verb in that case as well...

    Also, f.lux is only partially noticing the time zone change. It still says "Sunset in 4 hours" even though it's thinks it's Bedtime.

    ...And the graph has the light-phase order mixed up, i.e. "Bright before Bed: 10% circadian response" is on the left, the white Daytime portion is in the middle, and the Bedtime portion is on the right. Though the dot does sit in the Bedtime portion, correctly reflecting ~1:30 am UTC, (per the TZ setting I've chosen for testing).

    These issues with TZ changes persist even when exiting and restarting f.lux.

    Thanks for your time.



  • No, there is no missing verb. It is absolutely perfect English. You just have to understand what it means. It's basically referring to the effect that light is likely having on your circadian rhythm. It's purely about the biological effect that light is having on your body. The more clearly you understand what it's saying, the more you realize how perfect the English is that they used.

    Perhaps that should be something that you can click in order to get the full description of what it means.

    The reason it "thinks" it's bedtime is, f.lux enters Bedtime mode 9 hours prior to your set wake-time.

    When you have your wake-time set according to when you wake up (or really, when you WOKE up), you will see the dot being placed correctly where it will be showing the most accurate representation of what your light sensitivity should be.

    Finally, no, adjusting Day and Night colors together isn't the default behavior. That slider on the main window only adjusts the color temperature for the current mode of f.lux. If it's daytime, it adjusts the daytime color. If it's night, then it adjusts the night color. If it's in bedtime mode, then it adjusts the bedtime mode color. It doesn't do any more than 1 mode at a time. So, that's what that special area is for.

    So, there are no issues here. You just need to understand f.lux better, that's all.


  • f.lux team

    @pharside yes I was just messing with moving the "circadian response" text to the center - it refers to the current setting and not to the overall schedule so making it more global would be appropriate. Moved it back because I didn't get it all to fit. May do one more try.

    We have a doc with 50 variations of the "phase response" text and I haven't picked one that is both short and (more) descriptive yet. Maybe I will make it clickable and write a 4-page essay on it instead. :)

    When you see bright light, you are changing your internal clock (it moves faster than a real clock or slower), and we're trying to get f.lux to touch on that explanation. Sometimes light makes your clock later and sometimes it makes it earlier, and sometimes it doesn't matter as much.



  • @TwoCables said in Nits in v4.54:

    No, there is no missing verb. It is absolutely perfect English. You just have to understand what it means. It's basically referring to the effect that light is likely having on your circadian rhythm. It's purely about the biological effect that light is having on your body. The more clearly you understand what it's saying, the more you realize how perfect the English is that they used.

    "The sun is up. Light is making your body earlier." Body is a corporeal entity. Earlier is a temporal reference. How can a body be earlier? This does not make sense.

    The reason it "thinks" it's bedtime is, f.lux enters Bedtime mode 9 hours prior to your set wake-time.

    When you have your wake-time set according to when you wake up (or really, when you WOKE up), you will see the dot being placed correctly where it will be showing the most accurate representation of what your light sensitivity should be.

    Yes, I understand the significance of the dot on the graph. And I see no issue with that, even while playing with changes to the Time Zone setting in Windows.

    Finally, no, adjusting Day and Night colors together isn't the default behavior. That slider on the main window only adjusts the color temperature for the current mode of f.lux. If it's daytime, it adjusts the daytime color. If it's night, then it adjusts the night color. If it's in bedtime mode, then it adjusts the bedtime mode color. It doesn't do any more than 1 mode at a time. So, that's what that special area is for.

    My apologies, as I don't know if you have access to the source code... But I know I don't, therefore there is absolutely no way for me to know just by looking at the default single-dot slider, whether or not it's moving all three individual sliders behind the scenes. I don't think there is any way for you to know either, unless this is documented in a manual somewhere?

    What I do know is that selecting the option labeled "Adjust day and night colors together..." takes me to a panel where I can actually adjust them separately. Semantically, this seems a bit unexpected. Maybe "Adjust day and night colors independently..." ?

    So, there are no issues here. You just need to understand f.lux better, that's all.

    Been using it for many years now. That's why I finally decided to pony up with a donation. :thumbsup_tone1:



  • @herf said in Nits in v4.54:

    @pharside yes I was just messing with moving the "circadian response" text to the center - it refers to the current setting and not to the overall schedule so making it more global would be appropriate. Moved it back because I didn't get it all to fit. May do one more try.

    We have a doc with 50 variations of the "phase response" text and I haven't picked one that is both short and (more) descriptive yet. Maybe I will make it clickable and write a 4-page essay on it instead. :)

    When you see bright light, you are changing your internal clock (it moves faster than a real clock or slower), and we're trying to get f.lux to touch on that explanation. Sometimes light makes your clock later and sometimes it makes it earlier, and sometimes it doesn't matter as much.

    Ah, so "Light is making your body clock run earlier"? Thanks...



  • @pharside said in Nits in v4.54:

    @herf said in Nits in v4.54:

    When you see bright light, you are changing your internal clock (it moves faster than a real clock or slower), and we're trying to get f.lux to touch on that explanation. Sometimes light makes your clock later and sometimes it makes it earlier, and sometimes it doesn't matter as much.

    Ah, so "Light is making your body clock run earlier"? Thanks...

    So here is variation 51 :slight_smile:

    "Light is making your body clock run faster."

    I think this better expresses what you are trying to say? At least the grammar seems to be consistent.


  • f.lux team

    Yes it is a tricky thing to explain, and it is hard to explain "what's going on right now" vs. "what's going on through the day". People have a daily "compression" and "expansion" in their clock, and yet the main thing we haven't explained that the ideal case is when they cancel out and help you sleep when you need to.

    If you shut off all the lights at noon, your clock would "advance" from the day before - as if you had traveled east. And if you kept all the lights off until noon, you'd "delay" due to seeing brighter light later in the day.

    Normally these two regions cancel each other out, so ultimately we have to talk about the whole daily exposure.

    Most of the heuristic advice ("see more light in the morning and less at night") is because most people with sleep trouble are "delayed" or late types. But this advice is not for everyone - many older people wake up earlier than they'd like, so they may need different advice.

    You might notice that we focus mostly on "sensitivity" in the graph, and we're trying to hint at the overall daily response. But there are still some things missing, because it's complicated & hard to explain.


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