Fiber optic lighting for bright natural light, in a building.



  • We really need more light during the day, so what's the best way to do that? Artificial light? Windows? How about natural light, and the ability to put it ANYWHERE!
    I just wish a small portion of the UV rays got through, like 5-10%.

    http://www.parans.com/eng/sp3/





  • I took a quick look at this and WOW. I want that!



  • I thought you might like that! I think it costs around $5G total. Not bad.
    Edit: That get's you six "squares" of light modules, and one "input" lighting device that goes on a roof or even the side of a building.



  • This makes me excited for the future. I mean, maybe one day this will become more of a standard type of lighting!



  • Yep I hope so.







  • A fiber optic cable that transmits light.

    It says "light source needed" so that could be the sky.

    I'd probably wrap it in foil.



  • Obviously: "FEATURES: Clear fiber optics lighting."

    So, I guess you'd use it for whatever you want, as long as you can put light through it. Why would you wrap it in aluminum foil? Is that needed?



  • Well, it's a tube of light, and I'd want to push / reflect the light through from a hole in the roof, or something, and down through.

    I don't want the light leaving the small glass tube, I want it all to go to the end, and then be free.



  • @timpster said:

    Well, it's a tube of light, and I'd want to push / reflect the light through from a hole in the roof, or something, and down through.

    I don't want the light leaving the small glass tube, I want it all to go to the end, and then be free.

    Hmm. I guess that makes sense. Maximum brightness.



  • Yep, I don't want any of the light escaping until it gets to the end, or it probably won't nearly bright enough.



  • Hey @f-lux-team are we correct that this is a glass tube that light can go through -- and is it safe to vend a little?



  • Judging from its product page on Amazon, the answer is a huge yes. It says so right on the page. As for it being flexible, the photo shows a flexible fiber optic tube.

    I don't know what fiber optic tubes are made out of, but I doubt that it matters, just as long as they work and are of high quality.



  • O.K., but ... how the hell would I use it? Should I get a professional to drill holes in my roof and ceiling, and, how would I make it look good?

    It's only $12 last I checked, so, I'm really worried about how in the world I would set up the installation.



  • @timpster said:

    O.K., but ... how the hell would I use it? Should I get a professional to drill holes in my roof and ceiling, and, how would I make it look good?

    It's only $12 last I checked, so, I'm really worried about how in the world I would set up the installation.

    How would I or anyone else on the f.lux forum know? I think you're on your own with this one. You're trying to attempt something that's very advanced. Quite honestly, I don't know why you're trying to do it because this is a MAJOR project and would probably require some very specialized expertise for the entire project.



  • Alright, how about a 10 foot cable!
    "Perfect for star ceilings, landscape & interior lighting."

    http://www.amazon.com/Strand-EndGlow-Fiber-Optic-Lighting/dp/B00E75QIE6/ref=sr_1_68?ie=UTF8&qid=1437251243&sr=8-68&keywords=fiber+optic+cable+light

    I think that will do exactly what I want.



  • Are you financially able to do this though? I mean, seriously! $10 + $6.20 shipping for just one? Can you imagine how many you're going to need in order to build one of these light fixtures? Not to mention the cost of putting a huge hole in your ceiling, buying the parts needed to make a fixture so that you still have insulation and a waterproof seal, etc. etc. .etc. Have you thought this through? :)

    Man.... I'd rather wait until I can afford to just have the pre-made fixtures installed. Or, just skip it altogether.



  • Well, I have not. I like the way you are calculating it though, spot on. I would probably get just two or three, and see what they do, if I get it, I'll put pictures on the forum.

    It will be a while though, I'm not ready yet, (but I do have the money).



  • @timpster said:

    Well, I have not. I like the way you are calculating it though, spot on. I would probably get just two or three, and see what they do, if I get it, I'll put pictures on the forum.

    It will be a while though, I'm not ready yet, (but I do have the money).

    Having the money is definitely a good thing, but to be honest, I would expect this to be an extremely expensive project that really only the rich and famous can afford. Either way, I would look into hiring people who can help you accomplish this (professionals). Putting a giant hole in both the ceiling and the roof will probably be Maximum Difficulty, and you will have to make sure the weather cooperates as well. You might even need a permit for this project. I mean, this is a severely major project here. I can't even begin to fathom what goes into putting a huge hole in the ceiling that goes all the way through the roof. Then there's the part where it has to be finished, sealed, etc.



  • Well all that's for the future, I'd have to know if I like it first.



  • @timpster said:

    Well all that's for the future, I'd have to know if I like it first.

    I don't know what you want to do then. I thought you wanted to build one of these and stick it in your ceiling. I don't know how that can be accomplished without doing some major intentional damage. lol :) Of course, I'm not one who would know either.



  • Well first I have to know if they put out enough light. Then I can move up to the bigger steps.



  • @timpster said:

    Well first I have to know if they put out enough light. Then I can move up to the bigger steps.

    I'd imagine that they do if you have maybe a few thousand condensed together.



  • I'm quite sure I'd only need about 5 or 6 at the maximum per every hole or area that I want to light up, it doesn't need 100 of them.



  • The optical fibre is only to conduit the light which you have to put into it. And in the open air you never get there enough light to enlight a room. You should have used some mirrors or lentils to get there enough light, just the way the Parans do. And the light don't fly away from the fiber as you don't bend it too much. You should ask the seller or google it, how much you can bend it to make the light stay in the fiber. No coating could help you. Once it leak out, you never get it back, except if it leaves at the end of the fiber. There you could use the light for whatever purpose you wish, including to tie it into another optic fibre. However, for this purpose there are welding aparates that costs at least hundreds of dolars. It is almost impossible to join it in hands in order to proper function. Instead of optical fibre, rather use mirror tunnels. Or buy it from the first link in this topic.



  • Ah well that is very helpful, so you're saying I will need a way to focus more light, that's just fine -- how about a small dome like they do for skylights?

    Also would it help if I cover the tube in a reflective material?



  • As I said before, any coverage of the fibre doesn't help to lead the light better, nor reduces leaks of light, when you bend it too much. In other cases, no leaks happens. However, don't worry about too much careful bending, it usually stands quite much. Just bend it for example on 10-20cm by 90°, don't do sharp edges. When the light leaks, you can even see it leaking. So you can try to bend it on the end of the cable. Usually, it breaks inside, if you bend it way too much, and this break point is clearly visible when you tie up enough light insinde that optical fibre. Pointing the end of fibre at the sun may tie up enough light to see the breaks. So don't worry, just test it, and after tests, just throw away the broken pieces. Anyway, to use it as a light, pointing the end at the sun is not sufficient. It doesn't tie up enough light. Maybe try to get some information from the compay who makes that appliances, at least look at it, how it is made. You may olso try to contact them, like you were interested in their good and wanted to make an order, and ask them for everything you would like to know. And maybe they tell you something useful.
    P.S. And to the reflective material - just forget it - it has no sense of doing it, you can't tie up the light from the sides. It can only leak (but it usually doesn't). To tie up some light, you have to do it at the ends of the fibre. It would be the best to use some lentils. Or, you could use about 1000 pcs of optical fibres and point them to the sun. Then it will do enough light on the other side. Actually, how much does it cost from that Paran company?



  • Also I would have mentioned you can buy a coated optical fibre, or some optical cable, with many optical fibres in it. It is coated just to prevent mechanic damages. It has a better mechanic characteristics, for example you can bend it without worries of breaking the fibre. It is more flexible when coated. However, it must be coated from production, not covered by yourself.



  • That is very informative! I really appreciate all the information.


  • f.lux team

    For a lot of structures, the cheaper version of this is the Solatube, or VELUX's "Sun Tunnel". Home Depot has some kits from $150-250, and for a normal house you can usually find a contractor to do the work for <$1000.

    (But if you have constrained spaces or basements to light, the fiber stuff sounds really cool.)



  • Yeah I was thinking of darker spaces but I don't have a basement.

    I'll probably start off with the large tubes because it's easier.



  • yes, light tunnels (which I mentioned anyway, as a "mirrors") are quite better, easier and cheaper solution



  • Yep, also, I don't think I'll like the metallic material they put in the big tube, so do you think they would be O.K. with just not putting that in there, and leaving it white instead?



  • No there have to be some reflective material, be that glassy mirror, shiny metal or whatever shiny. In case that sides of tunnel will be just white, it would lead much less light. So it would be inefficient and only wasted money and/or your work. Let the metal there to do it's purpose and just cover the hole with something that blurrs the view into the tube so you won't see the metal. I would do it this way.


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