CTB color filters (tungsten to daylight)



  • Since I just bought a few fairly bright Incandescent bulbs, I am wanting to see if I could convert them to a more 5000+K color temperature.

    Does anyone have experience with this?



  • Yes, you can do that. A standard CTB (Color Temperature Blue) filter is meant to convert halogen lights (~3200K) to match daylight (~5500K). You'll lose around half of the overall brightness. Just be careful not to melt the filter or overheat the lamp fixture by putting it too close.


  • f.lux team

    A dimmer?



  • @lorna color filters, it's like the gels or some of it can be a plastic like material. But yes, it will be a LOT dimmer, I think this type of filter will only let around 35% of the light through, which isn't much.


  • f.lux team

    @timpster ah you are looking to make the lights more blue. Maybe check out the GE Align AM light (I used to just buy tons of Reveal bulbs for wintertime) http://www.gelighting.com/LightingWeb/align/index.jsp



  • @lorna While I appreciate your request, I do not like the purple / "blue" spike in the color spectrum. When they shift the spike closer to the aqua, blue side, I'll have a look. I hate the purple glow!!

    Would you happen to be familiar with other cool white LEDs without a purplish tone? (Even the fluxometer has the tint in it!)



  • Why do you want to do this actually? To aesthetically match your ambient lighting to daylight and the colour of your screen? Or to increase your blue light exposure, light-therapy style?

    As far as I know, all LED lights on the market - including the GE Align, and specialty high-CRI LEDs - use a 450-460nm blue led driver, which creates the spike you're talking about. The only exception I know of is the Yuji VTC series, which uses a 400nm violet driver, combined with blue, green, and red phosphors. I've never seen one, but from the charts it seems to have a smoother spectrum, with less of a 460nm spike, and less of the typical 500nm aqua/cyan dip. I'd be concerned about the 400nm spike though, due to potential eye damage.



  • @Elhem-Enohpi I want a smooth 4800K+ light to read by. I feel the only way to do that is with the Incandescent filament.

    I have not extensively given LED enough testing so I'll use my new Philips led bulbs and test a bit.


    Yeah, I want to avoid that strong blue / more purplish looking spike in the lights as it looks terrible. Speaking of spikes, I have a yellow / orange book, and I can see a bit of a green tint in the yellow under terrible fluorescent lights that are use in educational buildings, and however decided fluorescent light was the best thing to use need a bit of talkin' to. That uneven, dim lighting (no matter how bright it is--in fact less is actually better because it's so awful) gives me a damn headache and it's just the worst experience.

    No wonder I would take walks at school, I'd lose my damn mind if I didn't do that.



  • Yeah, for as long as I live, I will always prefer incandescent light bulbs. For me, no artificial lighting technology can beat the light they produce.

    For those of you who feel the same way I do, I highly recommend these light bulbs:

    http://lightbulb.aerolights.com/viewitems/aero-tech-bulbs-made-in-the-usa-20-000-hours/-a-series-light-bulbs-made-in-the-usa-20-000-hours



  • @TwoCables They look great on a dimmer! So far I've got a pack of the frosted 100 watt bulbs and they dim nicely but I'll put in a 40 watt light when I want less light. It dims more efficiently.

    I really can't get enough of the 200 watt bulb I got. I'll get a quote on what they want for the 300 watt bulb because it literally does almost double the light. I haven't yet got the 60 watt bulbs but that may be soon.



  • @timpster said:

    @TwoCables They look great on a dimmer! So far I've got a pack of the frosted 100 watt bulbs and they dim nicely but I'll put in a 40 watt light when I want less light. It dims more efficiently.

    I really can't get enough of the 200 watt bulb I got. I'll get a quote on what they want for the 300 watt bulb because it literally does almost double the light. I haven't yet got the 60 watt bulbs but that may be soon.

    Are you talking about the 5,000 PS Lamp?

    http://lightbulb.aerolights.com/viewitems/aero-tech-bulbs-made-in-the-usa-20-000-hours/ps-lamps-5-000-hours



  • @TwoCables Yep.



  • @TwoCables said:

    Yeah, for as long as I live, I will always prefer incandescent light bulbs. For me, no artificial lighting technology can beat the light they produce.

    For those of you who feel the same way I do, I highly recommend these light bulbs:

    http://lightbulb.aerolights.com/viewitems/aero-tech-bulbs-made-in-the-usa-20-000-hours/-a-series-light-bulbs-made-in-the-usa-20-000-hours

    So, what about more efficient halogen bulbs? Look at the fluxometer, they are almost the same light, and halogen is much more efficient, they just probably don't last nearly as long. (And many are not made in America, so there's that).



  • @Tungsten_smooth said:

    @TwoCables said:

    Yeah, for as long as I live, I will always prefer incandescent light bulbs. For me, no artificial lighting technology can beat the light they produce.

    For those of you who feel the same way I do, I highly recommend these light bulbs:

    http://lightbulb.aerolights.com/viewitems/aero-tech-bulbs-made-in-the-usa-20-000-hours/-a-series-light-bulbs-made-in-the-usa-20-000-hours

    So, what about more efficient halogen bulbs? Look at the fluxometer, they are almost the same light, and halogen is much more efficient, they just probably don't last nearly as long. (And many are not made in America, so there's that).

    These Aero-Tech light bulbs last 20,000 hours. Need I say more? There are other things in our homes that use far more electricity than light bulbs every month. I'm sick and tired of having to replace light bulbs, and I hate LED and fluorescent light. I am not in the least bit interested in finding something else (which is why I have never asked for help finding something else).



  • @TwoCables Woah, O.K.! I get the annoyance of changing lights, but halogens produce a good bit whiter light (if you get the neodymium glass--it's not a coating, the material is even used in magnets!) so I thought you'd be interested in that. I like the aerotech bulbs too, but I only use them at night for the much stronger yellow glow they give. In the daytime (in the morning really, and that's rare) I'll use the whiter halogens for the brighter light.



  • @Tungsten_smooth said:

    @TwoCables Woah, O.K.! I get the annoyance of changing lights, but halogens produce a good bit whiter light (if you get the neodymium glass--it's not a coating, the material is even used in magnets!) so I thought you'd be interested in that. I like the aerotech bulbs too, but I only use them at night for the much stronger yellow glow they give. In the daytime (in the morning really, and that's rare) I'll use the whiter halogens for the brighter light.

    For my situation, a 20,000-hour incandescent light bulb cannot be beaten.


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