"Light is making your body later."



  • In the main f.lux window, there is some text in the upper left-hand corner which says, "Light is making your body later."

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    At different times, it will say, "Light is making your body earlier."

    I presume what we're trying to get across here is that exposure to the blue screen light is making my body feel sleepy later or earlier. As it stands, the current statements read like they may be missing a few words.

    Is there a way to improve the text to make the intention clearer?



  • It is referring to your biological circadian rhythm. The only other way to say the same thing is by putting a paragraph on the window. They have tried very hard to come up with other ways to say this, but everything ends up being too wordy and lengthy for the f.lux window.

    It's proper English though. I can assure you of that. When you understand what it's saying, you realize just how perfect the English is here.



  • @TwoCables
    "Light is making your body later", is referring to the light from the screen and halogen light then? :3
    a) "Artificial light is making your body later".
    b) "Natural light is making your body earlier".



  • It's just saying that light exposure at that time is making your body earlier or later, whichever it says. It is in accordance with your local time, the sunrise/sunset, and your configured Wake Time. That's any light. It doesn't matter where it's coming from. Light is light. It makes no difference what the source is.



  • @TwoCables said in "Light is making your body later.":

    It doesn't matter where it's coming from. Light is light. It makes no difference what the source is.

    So sorry for being not agree with you, but the source really matters. :/
    http://www.ledinside.com/knowledge/2014/4/effect_of_artificual_and_natural_light_on_the_human_body



  • @scoenta said in "Light is making your body later.":

    @TwoCables said in "Light is making your body later.":

    It doesn't matter where it's coming from. Light is light. It makes no difference what the source is.

    So sorry for being not agree with you, but the source really matters. :/
    http://www.ledinside.com/knowledge/2014/4/effect_of_artificual_and_natural_light_on_the_human_body

    I'm just trying to say that while sunlight is indeed extremely powerful and artificial light is extremely wimpy by comparison, you can still use artificial light to completely disrupt and/or suppress melatonin production whenever you want and easily kill a well-established healthy circadian rhythm - all with only artificial light, regardless of the source of that light (meaning, normal house lights and computer monitors, tablets, TVs, etc.). If you don't believe me, try this:

    Do really well for an entire week or even a month with avoiding bright light in the last ~3-4 hours before going to sleep at night (especially light that contains large amounts of blue light), and wake up and immediately expose yourself to 10+ minutes of sunlight. The longer, the better. Or wake up just before sunrise and allow the sunrise to get you going. Be consistent with this. So, very dim warm-colored light for the last ~3-4 hours at night before going to sleep, and very bright light immediately upon waking for a good while.

    Then after that experimental period, go ahead and let yourself be exposed to bright light in the last ~3-4 hours before going to sleep at night. Don't even use f.lux: allow yourself to be exposed to the bright computer monitor all the way up until the very last minute before turning the lights off and going to sleep. Do that for a few days and then you'll see that even though artificial light is extremely wimpy in comparison to sunlight, the human body is still VERY affected by it. Your melatonin production will be completely prevented up until you turn all the lights off and lay down to go to sleep, except it takes 2-3 hours for enough melatonin to be produced for the body to be ready for sleep. By the time enough melatonin is produced, you will only have 3-4 hours left before you have to get up. So, it'll kinda feel like you only got 3-4 hours of sleep.

    So, even though we can't use artificial light to replace sunlight, it can still wreak havoc on us if we are using too much artificial light at night in those critical last few hours before going to sleep. Those hours should be spent unwinding with dim warm-colored light.

    Try this tonight: do a perfect job of unwinding with very dim warm-colored light. Use f.lux with the warmest setting you can tolerate (for me, that's actually 800K), and reduce your monitor's brightness almost as low as it goes. For me, I have to reduce it all the way down to 0 because it's a gaming monitor and so even the lowest setting is still very bright. Then, just before you are ready to turn everything off and go to sleep, bring your indoor lighting back to full brightness and disable or exit f.lux and put your monitor's brightness back to where you have it during the day. You will instantly notice a huge difference in how you feel at that moment because your melatonin production was halted.



  • @TwoCables

    Circadian ryhthm is not affected by the light itself but by not going to bed at the same hour (just when you are prolonging your daily activity, or when you're adding or removing artificial hours to your body with plane jet-lag journeys to the West/East). You can easily move your circadian ryhtm as you wish, towards or backwards, and this makes possible the night work shifts and also the rotational shiftwork, both very important for the human life. Arey they bad for the health? Yes, these kind of works are really bad as hell in short and long term for the family, social life and physical and mental health of the worker. Anyway, you have wrote nearly the same as I did: the source matters, and mostly artificial light depends on the type of dispositive you're using. .__.

    People are using computers with screen devices from decades ago, and eyestrain was a big problem for some people in the past and probably in current time in older computers with no Windows 10 1703 Creators Update. Fortunately, we all have available f.lux and other similar software for our old systems to help us to reduce the eyestrain and to reduce the difficulties while trying to sleep, good news for us all! However, I just simply pointed out in my first post of this topic that there is no natural sunlight at the night, so I wrote "Artificial light is making your body later", referring myself to the light from the screens and halogen lights by night, because the natural light only makes your body later when jet-lag to the West. .__.

    I apologize if I wrote any inconvenience due to any possible misunderstanding, because my english level is not as good as I really desire. :(



  • @lorna and @herf should answer at this point. They know the science extremely well. I'm saying that I know I'm right about this, but they can prove it. All I can do is just say "yeah, this is how it is but that's all I know." That's too flimsy, so I need Lorna and Mike to provide an answer now.



  • @TwoCables

    I think it's some sort of 'lost in translation' issue. Don't worry about that. Thanks! :)

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