Using LED lighting?



  • I have LED lighting throughout the house-all lamps and lights use LED "bulbs" and the kitchen has an LED ceiling light.

    No other kinds of lights exist--even my monitor is LED.

    So, when setting up f.lux--how can I account for that?



  • Any way you want. There really aren't any rules to this. Just go with what feels best.

    Also, no two monitors have the same color accuracy either, and everyone sets a different brightness and contrast as well. So, it all depends.

    Generally, you just want to avoid blue light at night so that melatonin production isn't delayed or suppressed - or even interrupted if it starts which can cause a delay for 2-4 hours. If you wish to use f.lux for other purposes as well such as like making your computer use more comfortable, then that's cool too. Whatever feels good to you is best.



  • @torvan - It may not be useful to you with all LED lighting installed, but some newer LED lighting can be color-controlled. I doubt that f.lux would control such LED lighting directly, but it might be possible to use the f.lux color timing and profiles to assist in programing color-adjustable LED lighting.
    (And it might be an inspiration for either a new f.lux product, or a major expansion of the existing product.)



  • @pwmeek said in Using LED lighting?:

    @torvan - It may not be useful to you with all LED lighting installed, but some newer LED lighting can be color-controlled. I doubt that f.lux would control such LED lighting directly, but it might be possible to use the f.lux color timing and profiles to assist in programing color-adjustable LED lighting.
    (And it might be an inspiration for either a new f.lux product, or a major expansion of the existing product.)

    He's not asking about controlling LED lights with f.lux. He's asking if he needs to worry about using a specific setting in f.lux to work best with the kind of light produced by LED lights. The simple answer is 'no'. It's the same approach as using any other kind of lighting.

    In other words, this question is coming from over-thinking it and over-analyzing it. It's just a simple process of adjusting f.lux until you're comfortable and getting the results you want.



  • Exactly. What I am looking for is how to use f.lux in combination with my single monitor (a LG Ultrawide 34" IPS) and the lighting in the room I am in (standard LED bulbs).

    When I go to "Lighting at Night" I see everything from Daylight down to Ember including Incandescent, Halogen, and Florescent but not one setting for LED lighting.

    So just looking for the most accurate setting is all. As for what "feels best" that would vary on how long I have been sitting at my desk--some days I do not need to at all, others it is a 16 hour marathon.



  • @torvan said in Using LED lighting?:

    Exactly. What I am looking for is how to use f.lux in combination with my single monitor (a LG Ultrawide 34" IPS) and the lighting in the room I am in (standard LED bulbs).

    When I go to "Lighting at Night" I see everything from Daylight down to Ember including Incandescent, Halogen, and Florescent but not one setting for LED lighting.

    So just looking for the most accurate setting is all. As for what "feels best" that would vary on how long I have been sitting at my desk--some days I do not need to at all, others it is a 16 hour marathon.

    Those settings are not named that way so that you know which one to use. They are named that way so that you have a general idea of what the output should look like. There are no rules for how to use f.lux. You don't have to use "Incandescent" because you have incandescent lighting, etc. Y'know? Just use it however it feels most comfortable. Pretend that all you can see in f.lux is the color temperature number.

    Think about it: why would "Ember" exist? How many people at home are living by the light of embers? These descriptive names are to just let you know what to expect when you choose them. They don't mean anything. There is no such thing as the most accurate setting. It doesn't work that way. This doesn't work that way.

    All you have to do is make sure to avoid exposure to too much blue and bright light at night so that your chances are as low as possible of disrupting your melatonin production or delaying it or or interrupting it once it starts. F.lux simply makes it possible for you to use your computer at night without dealing with the fact that the computer monitor would otherwise result in interfering with/delaying/interrupting your melatonin production. There's really nothing more to it than that.


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