Medium Transition Option



  • First, I'd just like to say that I've recently started using f.lux on my PC after having a blue light filter on my phone for some time and I think it's brilliant! I would just like to make one suggestion: I think there should be a 'Medium' transition speed of about 10 mins in the settings, because currently the two transitions speeds are drastically different, like two extremes - 20 seconds and 60 minutes. It would be really awesome (and useful) if there was also a Medium option of a 10 or 15 minute transition time.

    Also could you please confirm that when I am using f.lux with the default settings during the daytime, it is exactly the same as if I didn't have f.lux turned on?



  • @Greg-Allam said:

    First, I'd just like to say that I've recently started using f.lux on my PC after having a blue light filter on my phone for some time and I think it's brilliant! I would just like to make one suggestion: I think there should be a 'Medium' transition speed of about 10 mins in the settings, because currently the two transitions speeds are drastically different, like two extremes - 20 seconds and 60 minutes. It would be really awesome (and useful) if there was also a Medium option of a 10 or 15 minute transition time.

    Also could you please confirm that when I am using f.lux with the default settings during the daytime, it is exactly the same as if I didn't have f.lux turned on?

    You can confirm it. Just right-click the f.lux icon in the Notification Area, and choose either of these options:

    • Disable for an hour
    • Disable until sunrise
    • Exit f.lux

    I recommend just choosing "Exit f.lux". You can always open it right back up. Exiting f.lux entirely will instantly show you with peace of mind if there's any difference between 6500K and not having f.lux open at all. After all, it won't be open. Then you can open it back up and observe once again if there are any changes.



  • @Greg-Allam The 20 seconds option is only there for much much older hardware, that can't handle the slower transition speed. Most hardware can easily handle this, and 60 minutes is designed to be a close approximation for sunset timing. The f.lux team is still researching this information and much more.

    The Mac version actually drags out the transition even more, and lasts maybe 2-3 or more hours (I have no idea, but I know it's longer than 1 hour) and has two options. There is a "Sunset" option, that changes your screen to a warmer tone at sunset, then, when it's time for you to go to sleep (based on when you usually wake up), you're screen will REALLY warm up, getting candle like. I think the default is way down there, at either 1900K or even lower.



  • I always thought the 20-second transition was there for a few reasons:

    • To be easier on older hardware
    • To transition fast for people who'd rather have it transition quickly
    • ...I thought I was going to have more than 2 to list. lol


  • Thanks for the replies. @TwoCables, I've tried exiting f.lux before, I just wanted to be 100% sure that it wasn't affecting anything. I guess I should just trust my eyes.

    @Tungsten_smooth Maybe I should just get used to the 60-minute transition time...
    ... But it's just that 10-15 minutes would be the perfect time for me. (It wouldn't have to be exactly 10 or 15 minutes, just something around the 10-minute mark.) I think it's to do with the fact that before sunset, I would KNOW that the screen colour has been unaffected, which is good because during the day I want to be seeing the true colours, as opposed to the long transition time where the warmer colour slowly creeps in. And 20 seconds really does feel too quick.



  • @Greg-Allam What sunset color temp are you using at the moment? If you want to go lower than 3400K (Halogen) you can push the slider as far to the left as it will go (for either daylight or night, doesn't matter) and it will flash a button that says

    "Expanded color range" Hit that, tell UAC yes, and reboot, and you can go really really low. This will get you a warmer color temp faster, and get even warmer once the one hour transition has finished.



  • @Tungsten_smooth That doesn't really address the issue. I've tried previewing a darker setting. From what I understand, the transition time will still be the same, it will just get darker more quickly because it has to get to a warmer colour temperature in the same amount of time, but the transition time itself will be exactly the same. Also, the colour temperature won't get warmer after the transition, it stays at the same level all night. And anyway, it means I have to set f.lux to a darker filter, but I already have it set to the correct setting for my lighting (I am currently using 3400k: Halogen, because I have a halogen lightbulb in my room), so if I do what you say, the screen will be darker than I want at night.

    So basically, I don't think that's a solution. You're talking about changing the colour temperature at night rather than the transition time.



  • @Greg-Allam He wasn't trying to address the issue; he just wanted to share with you the trick to get warmer color temperatures so that he knows you're getting the most out of f.lux, even though you weren't asking about that at all. He's a good guy (he's a good internet friend of mine now), but he tends to always offer things up that aren't even being asked for. Sure it can be annoying, but he has a very big warm heart and he cares about each and every person he deals with and he usually offers things up and tells people about things just so he knows they aren't missing out.

    Anyway, it's not "darker", it's warmer. We're working with color temperatures. ;)

    Finally, you don't have to use 3400K just because you have halogen bulbs. The reason why they put "Halogen" in there is so that you know approximately what that color temperature should look like - rather, what to expect when you set f.lux to that setting. There are absolutely no rules to using f.lux: use any color temperature you want. It doesn't have to match your indoor lighting color temperature at all; that's completely at your discretion. For example: if you wanted to use 1200K at night even though your indoor lighting's temperature is at around 3400K, then that's fine; there's nothing wrong with that. You make the rules. It's your computer and your comfort. It's all up to you.



  • @TwoCables It's fine, I didn't interpret it as being annoying, I appreciate the help. :)

    I meant warmer, yes. I don't always know the proper terminology.

    I know you can choose whatever colour temperature you want in theory, I just assumed it was better to match it to the lighting in your room. I suppose it's more of a rough guide than anything else.



  • @Greg-Allam said:

    @TwoCables It's fine, I didn't interpret it as being annoying, I appreciate the help. :)

    I meant warmer, yes. I don't always know the proper terminology.

    I know you can choose whatever colour temperature you want in theory, I just assumed it was better to match it to the lighting in your room. I suppose it's more of a rough guide than anything else.

    It's there because most people don't know what the color temperature of lights are. Like, most people don't know that Incandescent is usually at roughly 2700K (except for special bulbs like GE's Reveal bulbs), and Halogen is usually a little cooler at 3400K. Fluorescent used to be there too, at 4100K - which is precisely accurate for all of the fluorescent lights I've seen ("4100K' seems to always be what I see printed on the box or packaging).

    It's not there to tell you that you should match the f.lux color temperature to the lighting in your room. There is no right or wrong with f.lux.


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